Rating of Activities by Calorie Expenditure

Fitness

Efficiency of physical activity threatens all sorts of diseases, excess weight, disorders in the psycho-emotional sphere. There are many options for active movement, and everyone can choose what is pleasant and interesting for him, what really helps to maintain shape, feel cheerful, maintain a normal weight. We offer you a “rating” of energy expenditure for various types of physical activity based on the “Compendium of Physical Activity” – a guide drawn up by American experts to assess and standardize the level of physical activity of participants in various medical studies. There may be other indicators in various popular articles and promotional materials, but the data below was obtained using standard techniques of health affairs and statistical data processing.

The approximate indicator of energy consumption is given for a person weighing about 90 kg, and it is obvious that it can vary depending on not only body weight loss, but also gender, age, intensity of exercise and other factors.

From the Most Energy-Consuming to the Most “Economical”:

  • Running at a speed of 12 km / h – 1,074 cal / h
  • Jumping rope – 1,074 cal / hour
  • Taekwondo – 937 cal / hour
  • Intensive swimming – 892 cal / h
  • Running up the stairs (on a machine or on a long ladder) – 819 cal / hour
  • Running at a speed of 8 km / h – 755 cal / h
  • Tennis – 728 cal / hour
  • Flag Ball (a variation of American football) – 728 cal / hour
  • Basketball – 728 cal / h
  • Roller skating – 683 cal / hour
  • Aerobics with high shock load (with simultaneous lifting of both legs from the ground) – 664 cal / h
  • Racquetball (playing on an indoor court with a ball and a racket) – 637 cal / h
  • Ice skating and speed skating – 637 cal / h
  • Hiking (long hikes with equipment and provisions) – 637 cal / hour
  • Cross-country skiing – 619 cal / h
  • Water skiing – 546 cal / h
  • Rowing sessions – 546 cal / hour
  • Hiking (hiking in mountainous terrain with little or no load) – 546 cal / hour
  • Swimming in the pool at a low to medium speed – 528 cal / h
  • Water aerobics – 501 cal / hour
  • Baseball, softball – 455 cal / hour
  • Strength exercises, lifting weights – 455 cal / hour
  • Classes on the elliptical trainer – 455 cal / hour
  • Aerobics with low shock load (without simultaneously lifting both legs off the ground) – 455 cal / hour
  • Brisk walking, more than 5 km / h – 391 cal / h
  • Downhill skiing (downhill) – 391 cal / hour
  • Golfing (self-carrying) – 391 cal / h
  • Power yoga (AshtangaVinyasa yoga is the most rigid and dynamic yoga practice) – 364 cal / hour
  • Volleyball – 364 cal / hour
  • Cycling less than 16 km / h – 364 cal / h
  • Canoeing (downstream) – 319 cal / h
  • Gymnastics Taijiquan (Tai Chi) – 273 cal / hour
  • Ballroom dancing – 273 cal / hour
  • Bowling – 273 cal / h
  • Slow walking, at a speed of about 3 km / h – 255 cal / h
  • Hatha yoga (performing asanas, static postures, breathing exercises) – 228 cal / hour

The explanation weight preparing has such a delayed calorie-consume impact is on the grounds that the more prominent the power, the more oxygen your body will require present exercise on recuperate and fix muscles, Miranda clarifies. By picking practices that increase that after burn impact, “you get all the more value for your money in the long haul,” she says. “Muscle is the most metabolically dynamic tissue, so the greater amount of it we have, the more compelling we are at consuming calories throughout the day.”